The Facts About Joint Replacement

Common Causes and Symptoms of Joint Pain

Here are some common conditions that can cause joint pain:

  • Arthritis
  • Osetoarthritis
  • Tendonitis
  • Sprains
  • Bursitis

When to see a doctor:

Although mild joint pain may be treatable using over-the-counter medications and home remedies it is always a good idea to discuss any pain you are experiencing with your physician. Pain that is severe enough that you cannot put weight on your joint, a joint that looks crooked, or joints that you cannot be moved should be examined by a doctor as quickly as possible.


Total Hip and Knee Replacement

Our board certified physicians have trained at the best programs in the country, learning minimally invasive techniques and computer assisted joint replacement surgery. Our physicians pursue and use cutting edge technology such as the artificial disk, andour Magnet award winning and specialized nurses provide superior orthopedics care.

Joint replacement is a surgical procedure used to remove and replace an arthritic or damaged joint with an artificial joint, called prosthesis. Total joint surgery is one of the most effective treatment options for chronic and debilitating knee or hip pain that has not responded to other therapies. More than 230,000 primary total hip replacements and more than 540,000 total knee replacements are performed annually in the United States.

Hip Replacement

Hip replacement, also called total hip arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure that replaces a worn out or damaged hip with an artificial one following a hip fracture or due to severe hip pain.

How it Works

Although procedures for hip replacements vary, the two most common types of artificial hip prostheses used in replacement surgery are cemented prostheses, where the prosthesis (made of metal and plastic) is attached to the bone with a type of surgical cement, or uncemented prostheses, where the prosthesis attaches to the bone with a fine mesh of holes on the surface, in order for the bone to grow into the mesh and attach naturally to the prosthesis.  

Traditional hip replacements involve an incision about 6 to 8 inches long over the hip joint, but with newer approaches surgeons are able to use techniques that use one or two smaller incisions to perform the same procedure but as a minimally invasive one. Not all patients are candidates for minimally invasive hip replacements. Your doctor will determine the best procedure for you based on your individual needs.

Knee Replacement

Joint replacement is a surgical procedure used to remove and replace an arthritic or damaged joint with an artificial joint, called prosthesis. Total joint surgery is one of the most effective treatment options for chronic and debilitating knee or hip pain that has not responded to other therapies. More than 230,000 primary total hip replacements and more than 540,000 total knee replacements are performed annually in the United States.

How it Works

When a knee is severely damaged by disease or injury an artificial knee replacement may be considered, and joint surfaces are substituted or replaced by prostheses, made up of metal with ceramic and/or plastic.

Although procedures vary, the two most commonly performed knee replacements are cemented prosthesis, where the prosthesis is attached to the bone with a type of epoxy (adhesive), and uncemented prosthesis, where the prosthesis attaches to the bone with a fine mesh of holes on the surface, in order for the bone to grow into the mesh and attach naturally to the prosthesis. Sometimes combination of the two types are used.

What to Expect After Total Joint Replacement

Total joint replacement involves a two- or three-day hospital stay. You'll receive an anesthetic for the duration of the surgical procedure. The surgeon will reshape the ends of the bones to accept the artificial parts.

Artificial joints are usually made of metal and hard plastic. Depending on the type of replacement joint used, cement may be used to attach some of the parts. Metal parts may be anchored by inserting a rod into the bone or with cement. Typical hip and knee patients can walk the next day using a walker. You'll likely be discharged on the third or fourth day, but you'll need time to rehabilitate.

At first, you may need assistive devices, such as crutches or a walker after hip replacement, for example. Within a few months, you should resume most of your normal daily activities unaided. You may still need physical therapy.

After shoulder replacement surgery, you can start passive shoulder exercises, in which someone else moves the joint for you, soon after surgery. Three to six weeks after surgery, you'll perform exercises a therapist gives you. Eventually, you'll begin to stretch and strengthen your shoulder so you can regain normal use with far less pain than you had before the surgery.

Recovery from joint replacement surgery generally involves some pain for two to three months. However, it's usually a different type of pain and will go away as the recovery period continues.

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